Category Archives: Elsewhat

…academics, acquaintances, activists, actors…

Looking through some of my old twitter threads and having been struck by a whim, I think I shall turn one of them into a blog post to enjoy it all over again.

Here’s one from the beginning of 2017 when I was getting more into Twitter and revelling in the variety (I like mixed herbs) of the people I found there, and was inspired to alliteration (always a sign of stimulation) in the form of this celebratory ode. It appears that I never quite finished it because the last few letters of the alphabet eluded me. Perhaps rolling it out again will breath new life into it.

As a suggestion, feel free to read this in a hollow, metallic, rhythmic chant with a southern US twang, like a solemn call to arms.

Perhaps you will see yourself represented in the list.

The muse strikes – I’m going to do a thread: alliteratively celebrating the weird beautiful diversity of the humans I follow on Twitter. 

…academics, acquaintances, activists, actors, adversaries, allies, alt-rights, anarchists, animators, antifeminists, artists…

..badass beauties, babes, bands, biographers, biologists, bitches, blockers, boffins, bots, brands, businesses, busybodies…

..call girls, campaigners, capitalists, cartoonists, coders, comedians, conservatives, creatives, critics, crossdressers…

…cam girls, calligraphers, collectors, columnists, commentators, companions, connoisseurs, courtesans, craftsmen, criminals…

…dancers, dank memes, daydreamers, debaters, debunkers, defenders, depressives, designers, developers, directors, dominatrices, doodlers…

…eccentrics, economists, eco-warriors, educators, eggs, egomaniacs, emos, empaths, encouragers, enbies, entertainers, enthusiasts…

…ENTPs, entrepreneurs, environmentalists, escorts, essayists, ethnologists, ethologists, exhibitionists, ex-muslims, extraverts…

…facepainters, faeries, family, fans, fashionistas, fathers, feminists, feminizers, femmes fatales, festivalgoers, fetishists…

…fictional characters, filmmakers, findoms, flirters, forest-dwellers, freelancers, free-speech advocates, free spirits, friends…

…galleries, game developers, gamers, gays, geeks, geniuses, gifmakers, glamour girls, goddesses, goths, greenies, gurls, gynophiles…

…hackers, hairstylists, healers, heathens, hedonists, heterodoxists, hipsters, historians, hobbits, hookers, housewives, humanists…

…iconoclasts, idealists, idols, illustrators, infidels, innovators, instagrammers, intersectionalists, interviewers, INTPs, introverts…

…Jedi knights, Jesus, jetsetters, jewellery makers, jezebels, jibers, jokers, journalists, joyriders, judgers, Jungians, justice warriors…

…Kath and Kim fans, kibitzers, kids, killjoys, kin, kinksters, kittens, knights, knockouts, knowledge-seekers, kooks, kvetches…

…lads, LARPies, leets, lesbians, LGBTQ, liberals, libertarians, libertines, librarians, linguists, logicians, loners, lunatics, lurkers…

…Machiavellians, MAGAs, makeup artists, maniacs, married couples, medievalists, mememakers, meritocrats, metalhead, MRAs, middle-aged men…

…millennials, mistresses, models, mothers, museums, muses, muse-seekers, musicians, mystics…

…narrators, naturists, nerds, neocons, neuroscientists, newbies, night owls, nihilists, nomads, nonprofits, novelists, nudists, nutters…

…observers, obsessives, offensive memes, oglers, online oligarchs, open-sourcers, opportunists, optimists, orators, outlaws, outsiders…

…painters, pansexuals, parodies, pedants, pedos, Pepes, performers, ppl w/ problem personalities, perverts, pessimists, philosophers…

…phonologists, photographers, physicists, poets, pornstars, princesses, procrastinators, professors, provocateurs, psychologists, pundits…

…queans, queens, queers, questioners, quibblers, quippers, Quixotes, quizzes, quotes…

…raconteurs, radicals, radio hosts, ramblers, people called Ranendranath, ranters, rationalists, reactionaries, rebels, reformers, reporters…

…remixers, retouchers, researchers, restorers, reviewers, revolutionaries, riggers, right-wingers, risk-takers, romantics, rope bunnies…

…sages, satirists, scatterbrains, scientists, sci-fiers, scoundrels, scriptwriters, seamstresses, secularists, self-proclaimed stereotypes…

…sexworkers, shitlords, singer-songwriters, sissies, SJWs, skeptics, smartasses, snapchatters, snowflakes, stalkers, stoners, storytellers…

…teachers, teenagers, theorists, therapists, thinktanks, thots, toyboys, tradeswomen, transboys+girls, translators, travellers, tree sprites…

…Ted Talkers, t-girls, theys, time-travelers, tokers, tramps, Trekkies, tricksters, trolls, truscum, twats, twinks, twitterbots, typomakers…

…underdogs, undergrads, undressers, unicorns, universities, unorthodoxists, unprofessionals, utilitarians…

…vagrants, vamps, vegans, video-gamers, videographers, Vikings, virtuosos, visual artists, vixens, vloggers, voice artists, voyeurs…

…wanderers, webcammers, web developers, WEIRDOS, whistleblowers, wikis, wishlisters, women’s rights activists, wordsmiths, writers…

gotta admit I’m struggling for words beginning with x

 


So Long Tumblr, It Was Fun

Just Because You Are Naked ...

Tumblr as a social media platform was a predominantly visual medium. While it supported textual posts, scrolling through your Tumblr feed was a cascade of images created, curated and shared through blogs you followed. Like Instagram, you could scroll through images of your favorite blog. Unlike Instagram, Tumblr’s interface actively encouraged reblogging – allowing others to curate their own collection of favorites and share their curation with others. The joy of Tumblr was discovering new art, artists and bloggers through an ever-expanding circle of like-minded curations of imagery.

One of the things that distinguished Tumblr from Facebook, Instagram or Pinterest was the platform’s lack of censorship. This allowed users to post sexually explicit photos, videos, art or writings. In fact, it was a bit of a running joke that Tumblr was the place to go if you wanted to view porn.

Tumblr, of course, was much more than porn. It…

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a street portrait

a street portrait of me (from New York?) has faded and transferred onto the transparent sheet it was mounted behind. the second photo, where i look like a pope, is just the plastic sheet itself, held up against the light.

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https://www.instagram.com/p/Bnut3lmH_ej/


portrait sketch from life

arty @deborahtun did this portrait sketch from life, of me and Thórarinn. We look like two Russian aristocrats, wearied by the responsibilities of power.

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Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

https://www.instagram.com/p/BnuvLc2HkMN/


MOVED INTO A FRESH PAIR OF PYJAMAS AND…

…I think i’m quite at Cambridge.

Hearing music with subtitles on “I’m Mister Coffee” with Martin Luther King’s “I have a bath”. Too utopian perhaps, but on the toilet I’m going to be prepared to meet inspiration halfway.

‘CBA to Sleep’ read by my Madame Bovary is a breath of special treat.

‘Wittgenstein’s Ladder’ by David Hasselhoff ❤ sounds like a snail who keeps farting and blaming it on Mark Zuckerberg in the seats of doom at an internet cafe in an escalator in with an itty bitty neck.

Fascinating. *does the Spock Sundae*.


weather-dependent witterings

my phone started including German words in its autocorrect all of a sudden one day.

it turned my sloppy ‘witterings’ into ‘witterungsbedingt’.

imagine my mild shock when it appeared fully formed before me, unbeckoned, seeming to have flown forth from my frivolously flittering thumb!


self-styled character portraits

funny…just saw that in 2014, I’d said that the reason I didn’t attempt a lot of self-portraits was because I was the one person that I was least in a position to take a photo of. (in just a small note about a selfie.) now, the (improvement and fine-tuning of the) selfie camera on phones has not only made this no longer the case, but it’s almost made the opposite true – at least concerning head and shoulders portraits. we may now be our own most accessible subjects.

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‘These alleys tell of the inner selfdom interpreting loudly at the level of the skin.’

'Intimacy and Abandon' by Amelia Weightman Lord

‘Intimacy and Abandon’ approx 40cm high. (one third life size.) bronze. limited edition of 12.

Did you know that I made a website for my mum’s sculpturing? ameliaweightmanlord.com

I recently made a facebook page too. www.facebook.com/ameliaweightmanlord

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The dead end of “culturally appropriate” art

These two things are important to remember. The logical conclusion of ‘cultural appropriation’ is solipsism. And talent isn’t fair.

Nick Cohen: Writing from London

openingaddress_bwf16_imagebydanielseedStandpoint October 2016

Can there be a culturally appropriate art? There is no shortage of activists arguing for one, and they are arguing for something new and sinister, in free societies at least.

Let me be clear about the stakes. Artists reflect the ideas of their times, and nearly all Western novels and dramas now treat, say, gays and lesbians sympathetically. They are a world away from the thrillers of the 1970s in which the lisping homosexual was invariably the villain. Such stereotypes are not the issue today. Nor is the argument about whether a male novelist can create convincing female characters or vice versa or a white novelist create a convincing black character or vice versa. Readers have always been able to complain that a novelist has produced inauthentic work. Rather than an argument about what is said, we have an argument about what right artists have to speak…

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what a lovely list of locks

Wow – an awesome list painstakingly compiled by Kajzh Hamm (fb.me/brambleroots) of many examples of the cultural phenomenon of locked hair across all six inhabited continents of the world:

> Indians (called jata, seen on sadhu and sadhvi; also seen on fakirs)
> Rastas (called dreadlocks)
> Polish (called kołtun)
> English (Shakespeare called the early stages of freeform knotting fairylocks)
> Gaels (called glibbes)
> Cree (Chief Pitikwahanapiwiyin/Poundmaker, Chief Little Bear, Baby Jack, and He Who Shows His Blood had them; exact name for it unknown)
> Mojave (Chief Inétabe had them; they were called hair rolls)
> Himba (called ozondjise)
> Nazarite (as per the Nazarite Vow in the Bible)
> Egyptian (Tutankamun was discovered to have had them upon his exhuming; many wigs show locked hair)
> Tlingit (a shaman named Tek’ic was photographed with them)
> Mbalantu (called eembuvi)
> Hamar (called goscha)
> Contemporary diasporic Africans (called locs after the 1990s)
> Aztec (described in the Durán Codex, the Codex Tudela and the Codex Mendoza)
> Chilean Pre-Inca Waris (had no writing system, so we don’t know what they were historically called — though mummies survive)
> Nyamal (name unknown)
> Tibetans (called “ralpa changlocan,” part of tantric Vajrayana practice, seen on ngakpas)
> Pima-Maricopa (Chief Tashquinth “Sun Count”)
> Sicilian (Gna Vanna’s locks were indisposable to her witchcraft)
> Bishari (name unknown)
> Aboriginal Australians
> Mongolians (shamanic practice)
> Maori (loose freeform locks called “rino makawe”)
> Ethiopian Tsemays
> Papua natives
> Fiji natives
> Angolan Mwilas
> Rarotongas of the Cook Islands
> Ni-Vanuatu of Tanna Island
> Kwaaymii (Wa Amaay Kwakas aka Paints the Sky Yellow, aka Yellow Sky had them)
> Drokpa Nomads (located in Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya)