Monthly Archives: June 2015

a little to the left a.k.a. I like big butts in a can of limes.
© Shlomo Gadot | May 2015
Paul’s Studio Reading, UK


“If you want the girl next door, go next door!” (Joan Crawford)
© Second Glance | Nov 2014
Lofthouse Studio – Battersea, London, UK


to kindle a light in the darkness…
– winter 2014 –

Untitled by rointhos

Via Flickr:

Wet print scan, Delta 3200 @ 12500


#lichtstrahl + #cobwebs #intheforest – the #waldlicht of the #elbesandstonemountains region at the #SächsischeSchweiz #nationalpark / #sächsischeschweiznationalpark / #bohemianswitzerlandnationalpark / #bohemianswitzerland between #Dresden and the #Czechborder in #Germany / #Deutschland | #chasinglight #catchinglight #daylight #elbsandstein #elbsandsteingebirge #forestlife #forestspirit #lensflare #lightplay #lichtspiel #leafycanopy #waldschönheit #rayofsunlight #etherealhaze (at Sachsen, Germany)


© Thomas Bichler | June 2015

Elbsandstein mountains – Saxony, Germany

“The nomadic gatherer-hunters live in an entirely sacred world. Their spirituality reaches as far as all of their relations. They know the animals and plants that surround them and not only the ones of immediate importance. They speak with what we would call “inanimate objects,” but they can speak the same language. They know how to see beyond themselves and are not limited to the human languages that we hold so dearly. Their existence is grounded in place, they wander freely, but they are always home, welcome and fearless.” – KEVIN TUCKER, Against Civilization

On Thomas Bichler’s blog: http://thomas-bichler.com/elbe-sandstone-mountains-and-rebecca-tun/


“Is something sacred? Yes, say I with Nietzsche. I could not pray to it, but I can stand in affirmation of its magnificence. This world is sacred.” (Daniel C. Dennett)

© Thomas Bichler | June 2015

Elbsandstein mountains – Saxony, Germany


adventures with myself / 
luxurious ‘still life’ by Allan Jenkins | May 2015 | London, UK


An Interview with Rebecca Tun

An Interview with Rebecca Tun


An Interview with Rebecca Tun

An Interview with Rebecca Tun


The reader walks away from real art heavier than she came to it. Fuller. All the attention and engagement and work you need to get from the reader can’t be for your benefit; it’s got to be for hers. What’s poisonous about the cultural environment today is that it makes this so scary to try to carry out. Really good work probably comes out of a willingness to disclose yourself, open yourself up in spiritual and emotional ways that risk making you look banal or melodramatic or naive or unhip or sappy, and to ask the reader really to feel something. To be willing to sort of die in order to move the reader, somehow. Even now I’m scared about how sappy this’ll look in print, saying this. And the effort actually to do it, not just talk about it, requires a kind of courage I don’t seem to have yet. … Maybe it’s as simple as trying to make the writing more generous and less ego-driven.

David Foster Wallace (via rebeccatun)